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 Posted: Wed Mar 11th, 2020 08:25 am
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Dr halibut hoffman
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https://www.iol.co.za/capeargus/news/overfishing-of-bronze-whaler-sharks-a-threat-to-the-tourism-industry-44209335
Cape Town - Overfishing of bronze whaler sharks in Gansbaai is threatening the shark tourism industry, with shark cage diving operators bearing the brunt of the practice. Conservationists and scientists are concerned about the high number of bronze whaler sharks being caught because there is a limited number of the species which provides great opportunities for tourists to experience the region’s marine life.
The Great White Shark Protection Foundation is campaigning for a marine area in the region to be protected from shark vessels and fishers due to bronze whaler sharks’ important role in the tourism industry.
Wilfred Chivell, owner of shark cage diving company Marine Dynamics, said: “We fully understand that fishermen can legally catch bronze whaler sharks, however, the minimal loss that fishermen may experience from not catching them in the tourist area cannot compare to the loss of an entire eco-tourism industry.”
Chivell said if the killing of the sharks continued in the small area in which his company operated it could lead to companies closing and people losing their jobs.
In the Gansbaai area nine shark cage diving operators employ an estimated 250 people and receive over 85000 tourists annually.
False Bay White Shark Adventures co-owner Stephan Swanson said the area, “where sharks seem to be less aggravated by human activities, also happens to be a well-known tourist destination for shark cage diving”.
He added: “Although fishermen are rightfully allowed to catch the sharks, there needs to be some common ground formed between the shark industry and the fishermen.”
Swanson said the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries should consider proclaiming the area a marine protected area.
Fishers were targeting the sharks due to the scarcity of the fish they had caught previously.
Chivell said: “The government is spending millions on Operation Phakisa to develop the ocean economy.
“Shark cage diving and boat-based whale watching are both non-consumptive industries.
“It is sad to think that we are sacrificing a billion-rand industry that plays a major role in employment and development in a small coastal town.”
He said no action had been forthcoming from the department, which should take emergency action and declare the area an “exclusion zone”.
Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries communications director Albi Modise said: “The Department is engaging with affected shark cage diving and fishing stakeholders over the next two weeks to seek solutions to the current conflict between these activities. 
“There are a range of options on the table which will be discussed and once an agreement has been reached this will be made public,” Modise said.
“Current levels of fishing on bronze whaler sharks are relatively low, and there is no information to suggest that this level of fishing will impact on populations of this species to the extent that it would impact on the ecotourism industry. 
“The slot limit measures that the Department is currently in the process of implementing for all sharks will also provide protection for both the vulnerable young sharks and the large sharks that contribute most towards reproduction and hence replenishment of the population.”


Now I assume here the fishing refers to the shark long line licences that work the coast.. They are and have significantly affected smoothhound and spotted gully populations but I dont think they have affected the bronzies too much. The fishery is properly monitored as far as I know, I am not a fan of it, I have seen them first hand laying longlines purposefully on the cob and bek marks when fish are around to actively target the "bycatch" which is BS as far as I am concerned, in another more advanced country they'd be locked up for trying that, in SA it is business as usual. But the complainants nonetheless are misinformed, the old timers been saying that this year is the most bronzies since they can remember, I have seen days when shore fishing and they are jumping like marlins all over the place, hundreds of them. I've had them chasing my plugs and seen 3 charging around a rockpool with the water halfway up their backs, chasing bait..Bronzies are full up, but maybe not in gansbaai with all the upwell that they have had.. ;)
What is very interesting is DAFF's comment on the fishery, in that what sounds like they are refering to the fishing in general, in stating that SLOT LIMITS are on the way, and as recreationals typically release their sharks i assume DAFF is aiming at the commercial sector too... If for sharks then I assume they are coming too for other far more collapsed and slower growing and resident species..I've said it here before, that they are coming, I've heard from my mate who consults/advises for DAFF last year, but this is the first black and white confirmation that I have seen from DAFF in the press..BoooooyaaaaaaH! Slot limits..here they come! I can't wait! Bring it on!;););):breakd::breakd::beer:beer:beer:beer:fst::fst::fst:


Hopefully soon it will be unlawful for someone else to keep that breeding stock that affects my future fishing..Years ago I'd be called out as a greenie for suggesting that maybe a fish should not have been kept, and harrassed by law enforcement for having a puff on the beach(not that I ever let them being grandmal epileptic and always knowing my rights but that a story for another day). My how things have changed in so short a time, for the better, soon it will be illegal to keep a breeder fish and now law enforcement must protect my private space and stop anyone harrassing me...LOL so the wheels turn..
The economy up to s#it, the country up to s#it..but at least no-one can legally harrass me anymore and I can be myself in my church at the sea, in peace, and the fishing is gonna get a whole lot better..the bronzies are just fine but slot limts are on the way!!!! WAHOOOO!

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 Posted: Wed Mar 11th, 2020 09:16 am
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Marthin
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I read one or 2 articles about it.
When you cut away all the BS, the shark operators are upset because their tourists are upset at seeing other people kill sharks. If there wasnt enough bronzies to see, then people wouldnt drive out expensive diesel to target them commercially at that spot.

The diving operators go there because the sharks naturally gather there, should the fishers rather go to places where they don't gather?

To me it looks like one group wants to protect their income and klaar.

The slot limits could just be a dream come true.

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 Posted: Wed Mar 11th, 2020 10:16 pm
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Dr halibut hoffman
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Ja, watch the https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgEULUuLJ9E..
No shortage of bronzies..and not basin effect either, all the way from cape town to east coast the old timers say that they have not ever been taxed by bronzies like they were this year or seen as many..which is not a bad thing as at least one stock is in decent shape, one day we were deep at the current and it was jumping bronzies everywhere, they were even jumping on rappies being trolled on other boats..Been a summer of easts though and not sure what that does for the bronzies at gansbaai but they been jumping all over..I'm not a fan of the shark longlining and any limits or increased monitoring is good in my opinion..Longlining slow to reproduce and long lived species like shark right inshore in bays off swimming and surfing beaches, cant be good and setting longlines on inshore cob spawn marks and bek shoaling marks..ja also..not good. But that just my layman opinion..

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 Posted: Thu Mar 12th, 2020 05:27 am
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Houtarm
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Slot limits are the way to go, but without proper policing big mama's will still be kept... At least bragging with the dead breeding stock on social media will become a thing of the past.

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 Posted: Thu Mar 12th, 2020 11:41 pm
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Dr halibut hoffman
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https://www.traveller24.com/Explore/Green/eco-tourism-death-knell-in-gansbaai-as-bronze-whalers-hunted-in-front-of-horrified-tourists-20200224-2
More on the the fuss.. The more protection for the sharks the better and MPAs in areas where they dive on them, why not..Ja to go commercially target them in the chum slick of dive boats is pretty blind! Each person has the right of access to the resource sure but the diving operations employ way more people and bring in way more bucks than commercial fishing..and longlining sharks inshore impacts all that depend on the fish for the benefit of a few, both line fishermen and dive boats, and recreational fishermen  (which is worth more to the economy than all three other industries combined) ..
But ja to go commercially target fish that a tourist boat has chummed in, to dive on, is underhanded and may force DAFF to step in.

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