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Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
Status: 
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Mana: 
Hi guys

I had a chat with one of my friends the other day discussing insurance policies and risk and how they then work out the premiums on the policies. I was made to understand that it is more expensive to insure a fisherman than, for instance, a surfer. The reason for this is that a surfer goes into the sea prepared for that environment (wetsuit,certain levels of fitness and knowledge etc), whereas a fisherman does not. If a fisherman gets swept into the sea, he/she usually have lots of clothes on, probably not such a good swimmer and just mentally not prepared forced into that environment and situation. That is in my opinion why a lot of fisherman drown.

I was a lifesaver in my younger years and rescued many people. Some were just in a bit of trouble while others were near drowning. 99% of these savings would not have been necessary if the people only had the most basic knowledge that I would like to share. So I thought of maybe doing a series on danger situations and how to avoid them, as well as when you ever find yourself in the water- how to get out!

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
Status: 
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Mana: 
Scenario 1- Being swept of the rocks by a freak wave

Ok- so there you are fishing alone on the rocks enjoying the scenery, totally at peace doing what you love most in the world. The next moment your eye catches something in front of you and before you can comprehend what is going on, you are klapped by a big wave into the water not knowing which side is up or down and completely disorientated. What to do?

1.       DON”T PANIC! – I believe this is why most people drown. Try work out where you are relative to the rocks as well as the incoming waves.

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
Status: 
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Mana: 
2.       Get out of the danger situation! – This will come as completely the opposite of what your instinct is telling you to do, but the easiest and fastest way to get out of immediate danger is to swim into the incoming waves, away from land. If a big wave comes rolling in, swim as deep down as you can and if you strike the bottom (unlikely except if you are very near the side of the rocks or in very shallow water)- hold on to anything your hands can find. Remember that most of a waves energy is in the rolling white water on top. Avoid it at all costs to prevent being slammed into the rocks! After the surge have passed, swim up, get air and prepare to do it all over again. While you are ducking under the waves, also work your way into deeper water. Do this until you are behind the white water.

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
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Mana: 
 

3.       Assess your situation and rest.-  Ok- now you are behind the breakers and out of immediate danger. Get rid of any excess clothing and shoes that may be hampering your swimming ability. Start looking around and try to look for places where there is no white water or less white water. If there is a sand beach nearby- perfect! This however is in most cases not likely. Important- There are always options to get out- you just need to look for them!

 

Last edited on Fri Jul 4th, 2008 07:07 pm by Hendre

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
Status: 
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Mana: 
4.       Get out of the water. – Remember that gully you decided on to land a fish? Or the flattish rock to your left hand side? Look out for potential “safe” places to get out where there is less white water. No place will be completely safe, but you can minimize the risk. Ok- you decided on your point of exit. Start making your way to that point slowly, ALWAYS WITH YOUR FEET IN FRONT OF YOU looking at the exit point. You do not want to hit your head against rocks after coming this far! Use the waves to go nearer- you don’t  need to swim a great deal at this stage. Also always look back at the incoming waves. If you are close to the exit point and you see a big wave coming, you will need to  dive under again. Be patient- the right time will come.

 

Remember that waves come in sets. Wait until there is a lull and swim like mad to get out and onto the rocks. Remember to keep looking back at the sea for when the next set of waves come. If you see you are not going to make it out in time, wait for the wave and jump into and on top of it so that the backwash can take you out to safety again. You will then need to start the whole process again. When you get out – get warm as hypothermia will be a factor and also get some medical attention as I can guarantee scratches and bruises!

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
Status: 
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Mana: 
 

5.       Conclusion. – I have done the above method and steps more times than I care to remember (was part of our training) and out of personal experience I can tell you it is definitely the safest and easiest way to get out.

Let me know what you guys think of these posts and if it is helpful. I will do more safety on sand beaches as well as dangerous beaches and what to look out for in a dangerous beach if there is interest from you guys.

Tsa
Senior Member


Joined: Thu May 3rd, 2007
Location: Durbanville CPT, South Africa
Posts: 638
Equipment: Torium 30 with Loomis Custom Built and Poseidon 3XH
Best Catch: 68kg Raggie, 12.6kg Blue Ray , 6kg Cob
Favorite Fishing Spot: Vleesbaai, Blombos, Struisbaai, Infanta, Langebaan
Boat: None
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Mana: 
Excellent post Hendre!Probably nothing will prepare one for when this happens, but as soon as it does and you get over the initial shock, focus on what is said here and just that might already get you through.

Thats the one thing I have learned with our firefighting training is that when you have an idea of what to expect, it makes it a little bit easier to deal with when it happens and gives you the ability to focus on the next steps.

Once again - well done! Have some mana!

Last edited on Fri Jul 4th, 2008 07:40 pm by Tsa

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
Status: 
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Mana: 
Thanks Tsa!

Very true what you are saying as well! Know the steps and your changes  of getting out improve drastically!

I'm off to Hermanus to go :fishn  big:wfish!

Enjoy the weekend everyone!

Tsa
Senior Member


Joined: Thu May 3rd, 2007
Location: Durbanville CPT, South Africa
Posts: 638
Equipment: Torium 30 with Loomis Custom Built and Poseidon 3XH
Best Catch: 68kg Raggie, 12.6kg Blue Ray , 6kg Cob
Favorite Fishing Spot: Vleesbaai, Blombos, Struisbaai, Infanta, Langebaan
Boat: None
Club: 
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Mana: 
Only a pleasure. You lucky man! Enjoy and watch out for the waves! lol : )

HEIHACHI
Sealiner


Joined: Mon May 7th, 2007
Location: DBN, South Africa
Posts: 982
Equipment: pos 5,tor 30, l&f perfexion,crossfire, magnetix 30cs, elbe waverunner
Best Catch: STILL ANTICIPATING
Favorite Fishing Spot: ANYWHERE THERES FISH
Boat: Mama San crew member
Club: CLUB SEALINE
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Mana: 
shot for that hendre! great stuff, i was a paramedic and i know its hard to do but in a dangerous situation the most important thing to do is remain calm!

so great pearls of wisdom there and keep em coming

drewmill
Senior Member


Joined: Wed Feb 6th, 2008
Location: Durban, South Africa
Posts: 427
Equipment: 5 wght mayfly fly rod and reel, intermediate sinking line, ...
Best Catch: 5 wght mayfly fly rod and reel, intermediate sinking line, ...a few bass and trout around 1kg, rock cod of ...
Favorite Fishing Spot: anywhere
Boat: no boat
Club: no
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Mana: 
dude please send more posts i work with a youth and this is stuff we can use for them, we also teach the buddy system
some manna for you boet

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
Status: 
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Mana: 
Will do! Just need some time as I want to try and do a drawing or two to explain better.

 

Cheers!

nizaam
Senior Member


Joined: Tue Aug 28th, 2007
Location: Durban, South Africa
Posts: 448
Equipment: l&f,13ft;daiwa sl30:daiwa sl50, torium30 exage1468
Best Catch: springer 1.4mt,rockcod 3kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: blue lagoon, beechwood,richards bay
Boat: no
Club: no
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Mana: 
great stuff hendre

this shows us what a life saver you really are.

keep up the good work man and may you be blessed for imparting such knowledge.

Sidd
Senior Member


Joined: Tue Mar 6th, 2007
Location: Joburg, South Africa
Posts: 689
Equipment: lots of stuff .... and still not enough
Best Catch: nothing to shout about
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hluleka Nature Reserve; Mazeppa Bay; Zambezi river
Boat: Hunter ski
Club: Nope
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Mana: 
Excellent article

vvt_freak
Senior Member


Joined: Sun May 4th, 2008
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 201
Equipment: rods: loomis, okuma, old purglass, shimano scitimar, reel: grandwave 40. ...
Best Catch: 6kg cob, 68cm blue spotted ray
Favorite Fishing Spot: arniston, macs, struis
Boat: no friends with boats
Club: 
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Mana: 
very interesting post indeed. I also did lifesaving but i agree that it's very important to share the knowledge.

what i don't really get is the insurance thing about surfing.

I've surfed for 9+ years and what i found is....no matter how prepared you are, when the ocean has it's own plans for you...that's it.

I've very nearly drowned more times than i care to remember (no matter how good a swimmer you are). It's very difficult to hold your breath for more than 1 minute while you're already tired from paddling and surfing. I can agree when the insurance company might say something like "you've got a bouyant westsuit and surfboard to hold on to while surfing" but all of that is pretty useless when a freakishly big set comes through and you wipeout. Ive been held under the water (feels like a human washing machine) until i've ran out of breath and just as you're about to surface you get sucked down again. So i reckon, insurance guys need to get into some really big waves and then they might realise that surfing could be just as dangerous at times.

just my 2c.

rofflign
Sealiner


Joined: Thu Aug 23rd, 2007
Location: Melkbosstrand, South Africa
Posts: 2363
Equipment: Shimano,Daiwa,Penn,Purglass
Best Catch: lithognathus lithognathus
Favorite Fishing Spot: The sea
Boat: Riot escape 12
Club: no
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Mana: 
yup! nearly drowned at koelbaai while bodysurfing, trying to fight the backwash.those big dumpers keep you under for a looooong time.

drewmill
Senior Member


Joined: Wed Feb 6th, 2008
Location: Durban, South Africa
Posts: 427
Equipment: 5 wght mayfly fly rod and reel, intermediate sinking line, ...
Best Catch: 5 wght mayfly fly rod and reel, intermediate sinking line, ...a few bass and trout around 1kg, rock cod of ...
Favorite Fishing Spot: anywhere
Boat: no boat
Club: no
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Mana: 
hey insurance guys know squat

i placed a claim about a wall we put in years ago and the assesor argued with me about the placement of the wall, we had it in accordance with the bylaws and he said for us to be able to claim it must be opposite, needless to say a spoke higher up and four months later the claim was filled

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
Status: 
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Mana: 
Hi Guys

The point of the mail was how to get out of a dangerous situation. I merely used the insurance issue as a starting point for why I wrote the email.

I was also a surfer and you must agree that as a surfer you know about currents, how to use it to your advantage, how to duckdive if white water comes rushing towards you and not to mention your surfboard you can use as a floating device.

I also had bad wipeouts where I thought I was going to drown, but it never got life threatening. I must also state that I am not and never was a big wave surfer!

Anyway- whether the insurance statement was true or not, it is an interesting point and the reason for me writing the mails.

From a :raine Cape Town

Hendré

 

camstaude
Senior Member


Joined: Tue Oct 9th, 2007
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 755
Equipment: SL30 and ELBE 12 foot waverunner; Horizon 5wt 9fth fly ...
Best Catch: 4.5 KG Grunter; 3.3kg shad; 1.7 kg rainbow trout
Favorite Fishing Spot: Balito, Machadadorp, Dullstroom
Boat: in the market for a float tube
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Mana: 
Excellent post. Keep them coming.

Will all stand us in good stead.

Reefman
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Joined: Wed Feb 7th, 2007
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Mana: 
How did I miss this thread? :doh

Great post Hendre!

gumboots
Member


Joined: Mon Jun 30th, 2008
Location: Cape Town, Tableview, South Africa
Posts: 81
Equipment: still equiping.
Best Catch: Galjoen
Favorite Fishing Spot: Anyware on West Coast
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Mana: 
Great post Hendre. It is important to stay calm but also important to at least knowing what to do when something happens. Calmness only lasts soooo long.

Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 275
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30,
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Macassar, Stilbaai
Boat: Skicraft 16'
Club: WP536
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Mana: 
Thanks guys!

I didn't forget about doing the other posts. Just a bit busy at work at the moment. Will hopefully be up early next week.

Cheers!

Marthin
Moderator


Joined: Wed Jul 9th, 2008
Location: Cape Town, Durbanville, South Africa
Posts: 13496
Equipment: BM G3, Seagrand II, Others, Shimano reels
Best Catch: 17kg Cracker, 11.8kg Cracker, 8kg Cracker, 7kg Steenie
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Mana: 
I can only add this from personal experience. You might very well see the blue wall standing up in front of you and making a "bakkop" like a cobra. You have a split second to react. Don't start running. Look for a rock that might break some of the force of the water, act as a shield between you and the water and dive in behind it, no matter how smal, as long as it is lodged firmly. Most guys dont make it because that 1st wave picks them up and smacks them against the rocks, leaving them either dead/unconscious/dizzy or disorientated. Hendre's best advice is to not try and swim for the side as soon as you hit the water.

ignoblis
Senior Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2007
Location: Durban, South Africa
Posts: 471
Equipment: Exeller Rods 7" and 9' XXH; Shimano Aerocast 30XH - ...
Best Catch: 1.2Kg Ignoblis, 3Kg Shad, 5Kg Natal Snoek
Favorite Fishing Spot: Sheffield Beach, Umgeni River Mouth, Beechwood
Boat: One Day
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Mana: 
Guys

I have also heaps of life saving experience and one more thing that could be added is should you be getting washed over a shallow or near dry rock shelf, one can get over by totally relaxing your body and protecting your head as the wave washes you over and not not trying to fight the current. This is if you haven't been able to stand up and dive over. When you fight he current you tend to get smahed up on the rocks where as if you relax you can literally float in millimetres of water. I have had to do this many times surfing over shallow coral reefs in Indonesia and Fiji where the reef is so shallow that as the next wave of the set comes through it sucks the water off the reef leaving it dry. There is nothing else to do but try relax and let the wave pass over you.

ignoblis

t-time
Senior Member


Joined: Tue Apr 15th, 2008
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 629
Equipment: rolling with the times
Best Catch: still coming
Favorite Fishing Spot:  Cape Point,
Boat: Lee Cat 800. ''Devocean''
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Mana: 
i agree with ignonlis, the less you fight the wave the better it is for you. i've been surfing for as long as i can remember and have some pretty serious wipeouts on some size waves, and like everyone has said never panic cos its only gonna make u do desperate things without thinking.
nice posts hendre
p.s try not to swim at koeel bay, people have died there and it has a serious rip and shallow closeouts

t-time
Senior Member


Joined: Tue Apr 15th, 2008
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 629
Equipment: rolling with the times
Best Catch: still coming
Favorite Fishing Spot:  Cape Point,
Boat: Lee Cat 800. ''Devocean''
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Mana: 
i agree with ignonlis, the less you fight the wave the better it is for you. i've been surfing for as long as i can remember and have some pretty serious wipeouts on some size waves, and like everyone has said never panic cos its only gonna make u do desperate things without thinking.
nice posts hendre
p.s try not to swim at koeel bay, people have died there and it has a serious rip and shallow closeouts

Tommiee
Member
 

Joined: Wed Dec 17th, 2008
Location: Franschhoek, South Africa
Posts: 1
Equipment: DIAWA AMBASSADOR
Best Catch: YELLOW FIN tUNA 50 KG
Favorite Fishing Spot: Wherever is sea water
Boat: Cobra Cat 500
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Mana: 
Hello Almal

Ek was  Saterdag 13.12.08 by Rooiels besig om kreef te trek en daar was nog een boot saam met my wat ek onbewustelik dop gehou het om te sien waar hulle hul kreef nette laat sak. Toe ek weer opkyk om te sien waar hulle is, sien ek net hulle boot hoog bo op 'n brander wat oor 'n blinder spoel en daar is niemand in die boot nie.

Ons was gelukkig genoeg om drie lewens te red te danke aan 'n duiker wat ook in die omgewing besig was om kreef te duik. Die water was twaalf grade en hulle was heeltemal uitgeput toe ons hulle almal aan boord gekry het. Die moeilikste was om hulle in die boot te kry ten spyte van die feit dat my  boot 'n trappie en 'n bankie tussen die twee enjins het. 

Die oorsaak van die ongeluk was dat hulle die kreef net se tou in altwee propellers gekry het en nie gou genoeg die tou kon los sny nie. Ek het ook afgelei uit 'n later gesprek dat die behalwe die skipper, die res van die bemanning onervare was en ek glo dit het bygedra tot die ongeluk. Die wind was redelik sterk en dit het die boot vinniger op die blinder gedryf as wat hulle besef het. Hulle reddings baadjies is saam  met die boot onder die water in nadat die branders die boot stukkend geslaan het op die rotse. Wat veronderstel was om 'n heerlike uitstappie te wees en my seun meer ervaring op die see te gee,  het toe in 'n behoorlike see les ontaard.

Ek wil net aansluit by die vorige skrywer oor sy goeie raad vir veiligheid en sê dat ons moet eerste aan ons veligheid dink en vooraf dink wat gaan jy doen in soortgelyke situasies. Is ons regtig voorberei om in so 'n situasie die regte besluite te neem?

Groete

Wayne
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Joined: Fri May 25th, 2007
Location: Jacobsbaai Weskus, South Africa
Posts: 2914
Equipment: Rods ,Reels,Line,Hooks and sinkers.....
Best Catch: All sorts of fish...
Favorite Fishing Spot: Any place I can cast a line.
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Mana: 
Great post buddy..just one thing I know for a fact...once you hit these waters of the West Coast,you best do those actions above quick,this water down here is ice cold... I fish with a wetsuit no matter where just in case somthing ike this does happen to be and God alone I sure pray it dont... keep the posts coming...